Retirement: The New Status Symbol

A lack of savings among many U.S. households could mean a change in the perception of retirement. It used to be a foregone conclusion that once you were too old to work, you retired. That’s not always the case anymore.

More than a third of U.S. households in prime earning years or later have no retirement savings and no access to a traditional pension.1 It’s become increasingly uncommon for people to retire in their early 60s, and those who fail to plan ahead for their future retirement income needs could end up with a retirement lifestyle worse than the one they had while working.

This doesn’t mean these middle-aged households are broke. Retirement income planning may just not be a priority yet. No matter your age, it’s never too late to start building strategies so you can enjoy your post-working years, and as financial professionals, that’s what we’re here for.

It takes diligence and focus to create a retirement income plan. Dwight D. Eisenhower once said, “Plans are worthless, but planning is everything.”2 This reiterates the point that planning for retirement should be strategic and committed, while at the same time fluid and flexible. Nobody knows what will happen in the future, but we can help you create a retirement income strategy designed to help meet your specific goals.

It can be difficult in the moment, but turning your back on pricey, impulse purchases, such as an expensive car, an outdoor kitchen or backyard pool, can help improve the prospects of your retirement down the road. Many people with good credit can borrow money to purchase these things, but good credit doesn’t fund a long retirement.3

Some workers might argue it’s not worth giving up indulgences today for a better (and earlier) retirement lifestyle. It’s a matter of examining individual priorities. One grandmother did just that when her 8-year-old grandson asked if she would be around when he got married. She had to rethink her priorities for what it might take to accomplish that goal. This led to a stronger pursuit of healthier living, including wholesome food, daily exercise and supportive social connections.4

While it may sound daunting to put in the years of hard work it takes to reach retirement, in some ways long hours at the office is a status symbol of its own. In Italy, the leisure class is perceived to have a higher status than the working class. But in the United States, there’s a certain prestige associated with working long hours and constantly being busy.5

Some people work 70+ hour weeks, not to earn more money and buy more things, but because that is what the working elite do.6 While this may not be the way all people wish to align their priorities, it does offer the distinct advantage of being able to save more money for retirement. For some, retiring is the ultimate status symbol.

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications 

1 Stan Choe. The Denver Post. Nov. 18, 2016. “Easy retirement for Americans? It’s only for a privileged few.” http://www.denverpost.com/2016/11/17/easy-retirement-privileged-few/. Accessed July 10, 2017.
2 Jonathan Look. NextAvenue. June 23, 2017. “What I Did to Stop ‘Awfulizing’ Retirement.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2017/06/23/how-i-stopped-awfulizing-retirement/#1d5429451baf. Accessed July 10, 2017.
3 Holly Johnson. Club Thrifty. May 15, 2017. “My Plan to Achieve the Ultimate Status Symbol.” http://clubthrifty.com/my-plan-to-achieve-the-ultimate-status-symbol/. Accessed July 10, 2017.
4 Jane E. Brody. The New York Times. April 20, 2016. “Thriving at Age 70 and Beyond.” https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/25/thriving-at-age-70-and-beyond/. Accessed July 10, 2017.
5 Lisa Tolin. NBC News. April 3, 2017. “The Busy Trap: How Keeping Busy Became a Status Symbol.” https://www.nbcnews.com/better/careers/busy-trap-how-keeping-busy-became-status-symbol-n742051. Accessed July 10, 2017.
6 Ben Tarnoff. The Guardian. April 24, 2017. “The new status symbol: it’s not what you spend — it’s how hard you work.” https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/24/new-status-symbol-hard-work-spending-ceos. Accessed July 10, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 


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The Longevity Revolution

How old do you have to be before you’re considered “old”? This number may change depending on the age of the person making the assessment. For example, a child or a teenager might think someone age 40 is old. That view is less likely to be held by a 39-year-old.

History indicates you have to reach a lot more birthdays these days to be considered old. One way to judge this is to look at pictures of your parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents when they were your age. Apart from the improved clarity of photographs in the modern era, many of us have fewer wrinkles and an overall healthier appearance than our ancestors.1

The data backs this up. A study by a Stanford University economics professor found that back in the 1920s, males were considered old if they were age 55 and up, whereas today that’s considered “middle age.”2

Of course, how we feel can change from day to day. Some days we might feel like a teenager, while other days we feel older than our years. We don’t want our clients to have similar feelings of uncertainty when planning for retirement. First of all, we like to help our clients work toward a well-prepared financial future. Second, it’s important to  consider that no matter how old you are, you’re likely to live longer than your parents and thus should plan for that eventuality. That’s why we work with our clients to create retirement income strategies for a retirement income that lasts as long as they do.

From a societal perspective, some of the reasons we’ve experienced a longevity revolution include universal access to clean water, sanitation, waste removal, electricity and refrigeration, as well as vaccinations and continued improvements in health care.3 At the individual level, people have their own take on why they’re living longer. One woman from Maine, 100-year-old Florence Bearse, claims the secret to her longevity is drinking wine. That, and people shouldn’t “take any baloney” if they want to live to old age.4

Another centenarian, Manhattan jazz saxophonist Fred Staton, is still playing professionally at age 102, which gives credence to the notion that creativity and passion lend themselves to a longer life.5 While a healthy lifestyle might be a strong indicator of longevity, it is by no means a definitive measure. Staton admits to smoking up until age 60, and rocker Mick Jagger — not exactly the poster child for a clean-living lifestyle — is still performing at Rolling Stones concerts at age 73.6

As for saving enough money to live comfortably throughout a long retirement, global analysts have noticed an interesting trend in spending among retirees. In wealthier countries, retirees appear to be aware of the potential for outliving their income, with many saving more than necessary.7

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Steve Vernon. CBS News. June 29, 2017. “What age is considered ‘old’ nowadays?” http://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-age-is-considered-old-nowadays/. Accessed July 8, 2017.
2 Ibid.
3 Ibid.
4 Time. July 7, 2017. “Secret to 100-Year-Old Woman’s Longevity Likely Wine.” http://time.com/4849191/100-year-old-old-age-secret-wine/. Accessed July 8, 2017.
5 Corey Kilgannon. New York Times. June 29, 2017. “At 102, a ‘Triple-Digit’ Jazzman Plays On.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/29/nyregion/fred-staton-jazz-saxophonist-plays-on.html. Accessed July 8, 2017.
6 The Economist. July 6, 2017. “Getting to grips with longevity.” https://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21724745-ageing-populations-could-be-boon-rather-curse-happen-lot?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/gettingtogripswithlongevity. Accessed July 8, 2017.
7 The Economist. July 6, 2017. “Financing longevity.” https://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21724751-lives-get-longer-financial-models-will-have-change-financing-longevity. Accessed July 8, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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The Changing Job Outlook: Challenges and Opportunities

The workforce in the United States is changing. Some long-standing professions are becoming obsolete, there are fewer manufacturing jobs,1 and some companies are moving their headquarters overseas for tax reasons.2 Then there is the increasing phenomenon of automation and robotics replacing jobs.

It’s interesting to note, however, that the job market is not fixed. It’s not as if people are being replaced by robots, but rather that the nature of work is changing and has different requirements. For instance, there is a steady transition from manufacturing to service industries. While a robot may be able to assemble products, it cannot develop software, health insurance policies or other intangible products and services that encompass so much of our income these days.3

As such, today’s job market offers unique opportunities for older workers. While some retirees need to work to supplement their income, others may simply get bored and want a new challenge. After all, retirement can go on for decades. That’s a long time for a career worker to be out of the workforce. By the same token, that’s a long time for savings to provide income. If you’re wondering how long your retirement income savings might last, come see us for an independent analysis. We can help assess your current financial situation to see whether it might be worthwhile to consider other retirement income strategies.

Another aspect of today’s changing job market is the growing shortage of skilled workers.4 When you think about it, this shortage creates an opportunity for retirees who want to go back into the workforce and are willing to learn new skills. According to the World Economic Forum’s 2016 “Future of Jobs” report, 33 percent of the essential skills that will be needed in the workforce in 2020 are not considered important today.5 This may create a good opportunity for people re-entering the workforce.

In fact, it’s because machinery is automating many previous jobs that some experts believe human creativity is the coveted skill of the future. It is the one thing that cannot be replicated by machinery, and thus holds more economic value.6 Pair creativity with experience and knowledge of specific markets and industries, and this is an area where older workers may truly thrive.

The best occupations for retirees tend to be in the white-collar sector and require experience, coupled with the advantages of maturity, patience and wisdom. Some of the top job options for older adults include consulting, local government positions, substitute teaching and tutoring.7

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Heather Long. CNN Money. March 29, 2016. “U.S. has lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2000.” http://money.cnn.com/2016/03/29/news/economy/us-manufacturing-jobs/index.html. Accessed July 13, 2017.

2 The Economist. Aug. 17, 2015. “What’s driving American firms overseas.” https://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2015/08/economist-explains-9. Accessed July 13, 2017.

3 Alanna Petroff. CNN Tech. March 24, 2017. “U.S. workers face higher risk of being replaced by robots. Here’s why.” http://money.cnn.com/2017/03/24/technology/robots-jobs-us-workers-uk/index.html. Accessed July 13, 2017.

4 Reuters/CNBC. July 20, 2015. “Survey shows growing US shortage of skilled labor.” http://www.cnbc.com/2015/07/20/survey-shows-growing-us-shortage-of-skilled-labor.html. Accessed July 13, 2017.

5 Stephane Kasriel. World Economic Forum. April 25, 2017. “Yes, our working lives are going through massive change, but that doesn’t mean we’re heading for a jobless world.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/04/as-long-as-we-have-problems-to-solve-we-wont-run-out-of-jobs. Accessed July 5, 2017.

6 Itai Palti. World Economic Forum. April 19, 2017. “Could creativity drive the next industrial revolution?” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/04/why-creativity-will-drive-the-next-industrial-revolution. Accessed July 5, 2017.

7 Jennifer Lawler. Bankrate.com. Feb. 26, 2016. “10 part-time jobs for retirees.” http://www.bankrate.com/retirement/10-part-time-jobs-for-retirees/#slide=3. Accessed July 5, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 

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3 Common Questions About Social Security

While Social Security shouldn’t be relied upon to be the sole source of income during retirement, it can play an important role in your overall retirement income strategy. But making sense of the basic ins and outs of Social Security can be overwhelming. Here are three questions people commonly ask as they approach retirement age:

When can I start taking benefits?
While full retirement age is 66 for people born between 1943 and 1954 and gradually increases to age 67 for those born in 1960 or later, you can start receiving Social Security benefits at age 62.1 Keep in mind, however, that there is a cost to early distribution; your benefits are reduced by about 0.5 percent for each month you receive benefits before full retirement age.2 For example, those born in 1955 with a full retirement age of 66 and two months who start taking benefits at age 62 will receive about 75 percent of the full benefit.3

On the flip side, delaying benefits past full retirement age, up to age 70, increases your distribution amount. If the same individual in the previous example waits until age 68 to take benefits, his or her benefit will increase 8 percent each year after full retirement age. This increase continues until you reach age 70 or you start taking benefits, whichever comes first.4

What happens to my benefits when I die?
It depends. If you are married and your spouse is age 60 or older, he or she may be eligible to collect a survivor’s benefit. The benefit amount remains the same as the deceased’s amount, although that amount is reduced if benefits are started before the surviving spouse’s full retirement age.5 A spouse cannot collect both survivors benefits and retirement benefits based on their own work record. They will collect whichever benefit is higher.6

If you have a minor child or children, your surviving spouse (regardless of age) may also be eligible for a survivors benefit until the minor child turns age 16. If you have no surviving spouse or minor children, your benefit remains in the Social Security trust fund and is not paid out to any other named beneficiaries, unless they qualify under the Social Security survivors benefits eligibility rules.7

Can I work while receiving benefits?
Yes. However, if you haven’t reached full retirement age, your benefit amount will be reduced if your earnings exceed the limit.Starting with the month you’ve reached full retirement age, your benefits will not be reduced no matter how much you earn.8 The earnings limit and reduced amount vary according to your age. To find out how much your benefits might be reduced, use the Social Security earnings calculator at https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/RTeffect.html.9

Understanding Social Security can be challenging, but you don’t have to go it alone. Contact us today to learn more about how to incorporate your Social Security benefits into your complete retirement income strategy. We may be able to identify potential retirement income gaps and may introduce insurance products as a potential solution.

Content prepared by Amy Ragland. 

1 Social Security. January 2017. “Understanding the Benefits.” https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10024.pdf. Accessed June 21, 2017.|
2 Ibid.
3 Social Security. “Retirement Planner: Benefits By Year of Birth.” https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/agereduction.html. Accessed June 21, 2017.
4 Social Security. “Retirement Planner: Delayed Retirement Credits.” https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/delayret.html. Accessed June 21, 2017.
5 Joseph L. Matthews. Caring.com. Dec. 24, 2016. “What happens to the rest of a person’s Social Security money after they die?” https://www.caring.com/questions/social-security-benefits-after-death. Accessed June 21, 2017.
6 Ibid.
7 Ibid.
8 Social Security. June 15, 2017. “What happens if I work and get Social Security retirement benefits?” https://faq.ssa.gov/link/portal/34011/34019/Article/3739/What-happens-if-I-work-and-get-Social-Security-retirement-benefits. Accessed June 21, 2017.
9 Social Security. “Retirement Earnings Test Calculator.” https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/RTeffect.html. Accessed June 21, 2017.

Financial professionals are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Social Security benefits. We are not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 

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Is Feeling Younger the Secret to a Longer Life?

 “You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.”

 

~George Bernard Shaw

While some people accept getting older as a natural part of life, many others are on a mission to fight the aging process and maintain a youthful attitude and appearance. Although we are often reminded to “age gracefully” – to accept our older selves just as they are – research shows those who stay young at heart may just be on to something.

If you’ve ever experienced the feeling that the image in the mirror doesn’t quite match up with how you feel on the inside, you’re not alone. In 2015, the Journal of the American Medical Association published the results of research conducted over an eight-year timespan.  The initial survey of about 6,500 people ages 52 and older revealed that almost 70 percent of respondents felt three or more years younger than their actual age.1

Eight years later, researchers went back and resurveyed the participants. They found 86 percent of the people who reported feeling younger than their actual age were still alive, as compared to 82 percent of the people who felt their actual age and 75 percent who felt older.2

What’s the lesson here? This study and a variety of others point to the idea that feeling young actually helps us live longer. It’s the idea to stay “psychologically young”: maintaining a positive outlook, staying active physically and mentally, and enjoying a life of quality even into our older years.3 But how can we feel younger? Here are four tips:

1. Eat right. Maintain a healthy diet, including plenty of veggies, fruits and protein. Also, make sure you’re getting plenty of omega-3 fatty acids, found in salmon, nuts and seeds. These help prevent inflammation in your body, which affects you both mentally and physically.4

2. Get some exercise – physical and mental. Feeling younger means moving more. You need to challenge not only your body, but also your brain. The Alzheimer’s Association suggests things like taking a college course, finishing a daily crossword and enjoying an occasional play or performance as ways to stay mentally active.5

3. Set goals for the future. Goals give us something to work toward and look forward to, no matter your age. Your goals can be related to health, family, career, travel or anything that sounds interesting to you!

4. Look on the bright side. A positive attitude can help you live longer. For example, a Harvard study of 70,000 female nurses found the most optimistic quarter of respondents had a 31 percent reduced risk of mortality.6 Sometimes keeping a positive outlook on life can keep you going, even when there may be negative external circumstances.

While it pays to think positive and keep a youthful mindset, lifespans of all people in general have gotten longer over the years. If you’re fortunate enough to live many years after retirement, you’re going to need a well-thought-out retirement income strategy. Using a variety of insurance products, we can help you create a strategy that helps you to live the kind of retirement you’ve worked hard for. Contact us today to get started on your retirement income strategy for a long life.

Content prepared by Amy Ragland.

1 Isla Rippon, MSc and Andrew Steptoe, DSc. American Medical Association.  February 2015. “Feeling Old vs. Being Old: Associations Between Self-Perceived Age and Mortality.”  http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2020288. Accessed June 8, 2017.

2 Heidi Godman. Harvard Health Publications. Aug. 5, 2016. “Feeling Young at Heart May Help You Live Longer.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/feeling-young-heart-may-help-live-longer-201412177598. Accessed June 7, 2017.

3 Ibid.

4 Marisa Fox. Fitness Magazine. “10 All-Natural Ways to Stay Young.” http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/mind-body/feeling/10-all-natural-ways-to-stay-young/. Accessed June 7, 2017.

5 Alzheimer’s Association. “Stay Mentally Active.” http://www.alz.org/we_can_help_stay_mentally_active.asp. Accessed June 8, 2017.

6 Deborah Netburn. Los Angeles Times. Dec. 9, 2016. http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-optimists-longer-life-20161208-story.html. Accessed June 8, 2017. 

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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How to Help Avoid Struggling with Caregiver Burnout

Serving as a caregiver for a loved one can be a wonderful thing. It often allows ill or disabled individuals to remain in their own home, surrounded by familiar surroundings. However, it can often take a toll on the person providing care, and can sometimes lead to the caregiver feeling depleted or exhausted. This feeling is commonly known as caregiver burnout.1

The National Alliance for Caregiving reported an estimated 43.5 million adults provided care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged loved one in 2014.The organization also reported the average caregiver spends nearly 25 hours per week providing assistance, the equivalent of a part-time job.2

While being a caregiver can be rewarding, it can also be emotionally, physically and mentally taxing. Burnout tends to happen when the caregiver neglects his or her own needs — often without realizing it’s happening.

If you are providing care for an ill or disabled loved one, it’s important to recognize the symptoms of burnout in the early stages. The ALS Association reports some of these patterns as signs of burnout for caregivers:3

  • Irritability and impatience
  • Overreacting to small things or comments made by others
  • Problems sleeping
  • Abuse of food, tobacco, drugs or alcohol
  • Feelings of isolation, alienation or resentment
  • Increasing levels of stress

The time and money dedicated to helping someone else can also be a drain on the caregiver. While retirees in particular may feel they have the time available to take care of a friend in need, it’s important they consider how that kind of time commitment could affect their own energy levels and financial resources.

How do you avoid caregiver burnout? Here are five suggestions from the Caregiver Action Network:4 

  1. Seek support. Providing care can be isolating. Reach out to family and friends, and tell them exactly what you need. Many of them want to help, but they aren’t sure how. Also explore online options. The AARP provides a list of resources for caregivers,5 including online communities where people can share experiences.
  2. Take breaks. Letting someone else provide care can be difficult, since others don’t do things quite the same way and it might be challenging for the person receiving care to adjust to someone new. Taking a break, however, is important for both mental and physical respite.
  3. Don’t neglect your own health. It might take some creativity, but find ways to work in activity, even if it’s taking a 15-minute walk. Pay attention to your own nutrition. Try not to let go of all the things that bolster your mental health; it can be easy to neglect your own hobbies and interests.
  4. Get the paperwork in order. Organize medical records, legal paperwork and other items so they’re easy to find. Introduce yourself to your loved one’s lawyer, accountant, financial professional and other service providers. Provide them with a copy of a power of attorney so you can have access to records if needed. If you have questions about how taking the time to care for someone else could affect you financially, don’t hesitate to reach out to your financial professional.
  5. Don’t be too hard on yourself. Caregiving is a tough job. Recognizing that you also have physical, mental and emotional needs will help you avoid burnout and continue to provide the best care to your loved one.

 

Content prepared by Amy Ragland.

1 Senior Helpers. “Caregiver Burnout.” http://www.seniorhelpers.com/resources/family-caregiver-burnout.  Accessed May 21, 2017.

2 National Alliance for Caregiving in Collaboration with AARP. June 2015. Pages 6 and 33. “Caregiving in the U.S. 2015.” http://www.caregiving.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/2015_CaregivingintheUS_Final-Report-June-4_WEB.pdf. Accessed May 21, 2017.

3 ALS Association. “Symptoms of Caregiver Burnout.” http://www.alsa.org/als-care/caregivers/caregivers-month/symptoms-of-caregiver-burnout.html. Accessed May 21, 2017.

4 Caregiver Action Network. “10 Tips for Family Caregivers.” http://caregiveraction.org/resources/10-tips-family-caregivers. Accessed May 21, 2017.

5 AARP. “Resources Caregivers Should Know About.” http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/info-08-2012/important-resources-for-caregivers.html. Accessed May 21, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 

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Tips for Bargain Hunters

For many of us, retirement means living on a fixed income, and that often means making a budget and watching expenses. One way to help stay on budget is to shop for the best prices on items that fall within our discretionary income budget.

According to Consumer Reports, even though consumers can now buy just about anything they want online at any time of the year, deep discounts for many products still tend to be seasonal.1 For example, the best time to buy summer clothes is halfway through the summer, when stores cut prices to move inventory and make room for the next season’s stock.2

The following list from Consumer Reports details the best months for buying certain consumer items.3

  • January — bathroom scales, ellipticals, linens and sheets, treadmills, TVs, winter sports gear and clothing
  • February — humidifiers, mattresses, winter sports gear and coats
  • March — boxed chocolates, digital cameras, ellipticals, humidifiers and treadmills 
  • April — carpet, desktop and laptop computers and digital cameras
  • May — baby high chairs, desktop and laptop computers, interior and exterior paints, mattresses, strollers and wood stains
  • June — camcorders, ellipticals, indoor furniture, summer sports gear and treadmills
  • July — camcorders, decking, exterior and interior paint, siding, summer clothing and wood stains
  • August — air conditioners, backpacks and back-to-school goods, dehumidifiers, outdoor furniture and snow blowers
  • September — desktop and laptop computers, digital cameras, interior and exterior paint, lawn mowers and tractors, printers and snow blowers
  • October — desktop computers, digital cameras, gas grills, lawn mowers and tractors
  • November — camcorders, gas grills, GPS and TVs  
  • December —  Blu-Ray players, camcorders, e-book readers, gas grills, GPS, headphones, kitchen cookware, major appliances and TVs 

According to US News & World Report, the best time to buy a car is not when you see all those ads on TV for Presidents Day, etc. Rather, the best months to shop for good deals are May, October, November and December. The best days to shop are Mondays, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.4

When it comes to holiday gift giving, some of the spoils go to those who procrastinate. If your gift list doesn’t include popular items that will sell out, waiting until the last 10 days before Christmas frequently can net the highest savings. Looking for holiday lights and decorations? The best time to shop is just after the big day, when you can stock up for next year at clearance prices.5

If you’re in the market to buy or sell a house, note that the best time for sellers to list a home is in May, when the supply of houses is tight, thus commanding the highest prices. The best time to buy is at summer’s end, when sellers are cutting house prices that have been on the market for several months.6

As for where to find the best bargains, you’re probably already familiar with local discount stores and volume warehouses. If you’re a member of Amazon Prime, be on the lookout for “Prime Day” each year when the online retailer drastically reduces prices on select items for 24 hours for Prime members. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, “Prime Day” is the time to join because the annual membership fee is usually reduced as well.7

Of course, one of the best ways to stay on budget during retirement is to help ensure your income is ongoing and reliable, which is something we can help with. Give us a call so we can talk about how we can help you create strategies using a variety of insurance products to help you work toward your retirement income goals.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Consumer Reports. “Best Time to Buy Things.” http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/money/best-time-to-buy-things/index.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

2 Nikki Willhite. All Things Frugal. “Shopping the Seasonal Sales.” http://www.allthingsfrugal.com/s_sale.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

3 Consumer Reports. “Best Time to Buy Things.” http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/money/best-time-to-buy-things/index.htm. Accessed June 22, 2017.

4 Eric C. Evarts. US News & World Report. March 31, 2017. “6 Best Times to Buy a Car.” https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/6-best-times-to-buy-a-car. Accessed June 22, 2017.

5 Denise Groene. The Wichita Eagle. June 16, 2017. “When is the best time to buy a grill, and other stuff.” http://www.kansas.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/article156570289.html. Accessed June 22, 2017.

6 Susie Gharib. Fortune. June 21, 2017. “Do’s and Don’ts for Buying and Selling a House.” http://fortune.com/2017/06/21/zillow-tips-for-buying-and-selling-a-house/. Accessed June 22, 2017.

7 Matt Swider. TechRadar. June 28, 2017. “Amazon Prime Day deals 2017 in the US: Find the best sales for July 11.” http://www.techradar.com/news/amazon-prime-day-2017-usa-when-is-it-and-how-can-you-find-the-best-deals. Accessed June 30, 2017.

 

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Expenses That Come With Caring

We spend our lives caring for others — at least if we’re lucky. One of the greatest treasures in life is having people, causes and pets to care for. Unfortunately, caring for others can have its challenges, including additional stress and financial burdens.

Sometimes we get so caught up in making money that we don’t pay attention to how much we spend. Some of the money we spend may not really register because we use it to take care of others’ needs; what we may deem to be a necessary expense certainly doesn’t feel like discretionary spending.

But spending is spending, and we all need to take a careful look at how much of our money we use on caring for others, or “care management.” These expenses could include the money we spend raising our children, or helping them out when they’re older and nearly independent, but still need extra cash now and then.

We also should consider the amount of money we spend on elder care, whether for ourselves or loved ones. One recent study found that it costs families more to care for a frail older adult than to raise a child in the first 17 years of life.1 Many families are taking care of seniors diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at home for as long as possible, given the increasing price tag of providing full-time care.2  Some insurance products, such as life insurance and annuities, provide various options you may want to considerto help cover the potential costs of some of these care needs. If you’d like to find out more, please give us a call. We’d be happy to discuss options based on your unique situation.

Charitable donations are also a care management item, and going forward, there may be a greater call for private donations if the government cuts the budget in areas like the cultural arts. There is also concern that reduced funding on the environment could have long-ranging impacts on care issues. For example, scientists note climate change can impact the spread of infectious diseases carried by animals and insects, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, Zika and dengue. Further, compromised water systems can lead to waterborne infections like cholera and other gastrointestinal conditions.3

To end on a brighter note, here’s a heartwarming story related to caring and making someone’s day. Students of White Bear Lake Area High School in Minnesota have an annual tradition of staging a runway march through a local senior center in their fancy dress on the way to prom night.4 Just imagine the post-march chats among seniors about their high school days! It’s an engaging idea that demonstrates it doesn’t take a lot of money to stage a caring moment between generations.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Howard Gleckman. Forbes. Jan. 18, 2017. “Families Spend More to Care for Their Aging Parents Than To Raise Their Kids.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2017/01/18/families-spend-more-to-care-for-their-aging-parents-than-to-raise-their-kids/#924f7e6f4a50. Accessed May 12, 2017.

2 Bruce Jaspen. Forbes. March 7, 2017. “Alzheimer’s Staggering $259B Cost Could Break Medicare.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2017/03/07/u-s-cost-of-alzheimers-eclipses-250-billion/#294c3f5471e5. Accessed May 12, 2017.

3 Peter Grinspoon. Harvard Medical School. March 29, 2017. “Our planet, ourselves: Climate change and health.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/planet-climate-change-health-2017032911481. Accessed May 12, 2017.
4 White Bear Press. May 10, 2017. “Students take a prom march through Cerenity Senior Care Center.”
http://www.presspubs.com/white_bear/article_67400d02-35a8-11e7-b749-731700102e0f.html. Accessed May 12, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 

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Retirement: Loneliness Can Sneak Up on You

Even people who have spent a lot of time planning for retirement may encounter unexpected challenges once they’re in those golden years. They focus on retirement income planning, which is, of course, important and appropriate — and we can help you there. They also focus on things they want to do while they’re still in good health, such as traveling or playing pickleball. They look forward to spending more time with their spouse and good friends.

It can be quite joyful, but the less joyful realization often sets in when a spouse or a close friend passes away. That’s when many retirees truly understand they are facing the reality of their mortality. Apart from that, they’ve also lost a best friend and companion.1

Sometimes the pain of loss causes us to want to avoid that pain altogether, which can lead to an even unwitting desire to isolate ourselves. Unfortunately, this can be particularly problematic during retirement, when people are less likely to have scheduled daily interaction with others outside the household.

Studies in the U.S. and Britain show the prevalence of loneliness among people older than 60 ranges from 10 percent to 46 percent.2 Additionally, people with low levels of social interaction can experience brain changes that cause them to see other human faces as threatening and, therefore, are less likely to seek social ties.3 It’s all kind of ironic, isn’t it? With so many people experiencing the same malady, you would hope we could find each other, since companionship would certainly help.

One social scientist — Robin Dunbar, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford — summed it up with this observation: “It has become apparent in the last 10 years that the most important factor influencing your health, well-being, risk of falling ill, even your risk of dying and divorce is actually the size of your friend network.” His research shows bonding is strongest when endorphins are released, so he recommends that one way to strengthen friendships is by singing, dancing and working out with others.4

Retirement isolation is being studied from a number of different perspectives, particularly in housing. Although many retirees are reluctant to move to an assisted living facility, the longer they live, the more they will need help. Some have taken to moving into co-housing apartment buildings in which the tenants plan activities and support each other without all the rules and restrictions of a retirement home.5

We’re always happy to get together and chat with you about any retirement income planning questions you might have. Give us a call if we can be of assistance  and be sure to spend time with friends and family doing the activities you enjoy. 

 Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 National Institute on Aging. July 2016. “Mourning the Death of a Spouse.” https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/mourning-death-spouse. Accessed May 28, 2017.

 

2 Katie Hafner. The New York Times. Sept. 5, 2016. “Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness.” https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/health/lonliness-aging-health-effects.html?_r=2. Accessed June 13, 2017.

3 Olga Khazan. The Atlantic. April 6, 2017. “How Loneliness Begets Loneliness.” https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/04/how-loneliness-begets-loneliness/521841/.

4 Aylin Woodward. Scientific American. May 1, 2017. “With a Little Help from My Friends.” https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/with-a-little-help-from-my-friends/?WT.mc_id=SA_TW_MB_NEWS. Accessed May 28, 2017.

5 Idil Mussa. CBC News. May 2, 2017. “Seniors in Ottawa look to co-housing to avoid isolation.” http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/seniors-in-ottawa-look-to-co-housing-to-avoid-isolation-as-they-age-1.4094267. Accessed May 28, 2017.

 

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.


The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 

 

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Considerations for Retiring Couples

Retirement is another chapter in your life; one that requires not only planning but day-to-day maintenance once you get there. And if you have a partner in life, it’s important to remember that your retirement, like a tandem bike, is built for two.

 

Planning for your own retirement is complicated enough, but doing so at the same time as your spouse can be daunting, with additional details to consider.

 

For starters, you and your spouse may have two completely different sets of needs in retirement.1 One may have health problems requiring expensive medications and frequent visits to the doctor. The other may live 20 years or more after the first spouse dies. Two people. Two different income needs.

 

When most people plan for retirement, they figure out how much household income they need. Their income sources may include two Social Security checks, a pension or other employer-sponsored plan, and withdrawals from personal savings accounts. But have you thought about how much income would be lost when one spouse passes away?

 

In some cases, the household income may go down to one Social Security check, less pension income and reduced personal savings once lingering medical bills and funeral expenses have been paid. In this situation, it’s helpful to know that a surviving spouse may be eligible for a lump sum death payment of $255 from Social Security to help pay for funeral or burial costs.2

 

Married couples frequently enjoy savings from shared costs by living in one house with one set of utility and cable bills. However, when one spouse passes away, those costs usually remain static; it’s not as if they’re reduced by half because only one spouse lives there going forward.

 

Consider this situation and ask yourself — will the surviving spouse need less money to maintain the household? In many cases, that person will likely need more money to hire someone to do some of the chores previously handled by the deceased spouse. Will the survivor have lower medical bills? Not likely if he or she lives into their 90s or beyond. What about housing? Will there be enough money should the survivor need living assistance or full-time nursing care down the road?

 

With all these questions to consider, it may be worth exploring various ways to help protect a surviving spouse’s financial situation, such as buying life insurance3 and/or working with a qualified attorney to establish a trust.Please keep us in mind if you and your spouse could use some help planning for retirement income. As an independent financial services firm, we help people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

 

1 Jeff Brown. U.S. News & World Report. May 17, 2017. “Investing Advice for May-December Marriages.” http://money.usnews.com/investing/articles/2017-05-17/investing-advice-for-may-december-marriages. Accessed May 26, 2017.

2 Wesley E. Wright, Molly Dear Abshire. Laredo Morning Times. May 18, 2017. “Elder law: Social Security – Many fail to apply for death benefit.” http://www.lmtonline.com/news/article/Elder-law-Social-Security-Many-fail-to-apply-11156931.php. Accessed May 26, 2017.

3 Jamie Hopkins. Forbes. April 27, 2017. “Why Life Insurance Is Essential for Retirement Planning.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiehopkins/2017/04/27/why-life-insurance-is-essential-for-retirement-planning/#4b15989b31cd. Accessed May 26, 2017.

 

Life insurance policies are contracts between you and an insurance company. Life insurance product guarantees rely on the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

 

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. We are able to provide you with information but not guidance or advice related to Social Security benefits. Our firm is not affiliated with the Social Security Administration or any governmental agency.


The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 


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